There was a bunch or there were a bunch?! Confusing collective nouns #writing #ptboeditors

“Bottom line: When the collection referred to by the word bunch is made up of people, a plural verb does not jar. When referring to bundles of straw, grass, grapes, cornhusks and the like, pair bunch with a singular verb.” But read this whole article for a more thorough explanation.

https://www.dailywritingtips.com/a-bunch-of-comments/

 

New Dictionary of Canadianisms — who knew?! – The Globe and Mail @ptboeditors #copyediting

“Marshall McLuhan once said Canada is the world’s only country that knows how to live without an identity. What more is needed to bind us together than a dictionary with a 4,833-word entry for “eh” and an account of the profound nationalist meaning of “all-dressed” in both official languages?”

Source: Dictionary of Canadianisms is ‘tabled’ and ‘all-dressed’ – The Globe and Mail

The Canadian spelling of grey jay/whisky jack is ruffling some feathers @ptboeditors #copyediting

The copyeditor frequently has to explain her spelling or style choices. In this case, it was prompted by the confusion between Canadian and US spelling.

The Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s choice of the grey jay, also called the whisky jack, as Canada’s new national bird has ruffled some feathers — and the correct spelling of the bird’s name has provoked confused and angry comments from CBC readers.

Source: CBC’s spelling of grey jay/whisky jack is not for the birds